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Old 04-15-2004, 06:37 AM   #1
Cross Bones
 
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Hey there,
I've just started doing Oly-lifts about a month ago(actually I've done power cleans for more than a year so I adopted snatch and squat clean fairly easily.) anyway, I know in periodization, there're the hyperthropy(high volume, low to moderate intensity), strength(low volume, high intensity), power, maintenance stages. I'm at the first stage right now, which requires high volume for each workout. right now I'm doing back squat and power clean on the same day. but I'm beginning to wonder, since I'm not doing any competitive sport can I vary the periodization stage of each workout? eg I want to increase my leg muscles so I do low reps and high intensity. but I still want to do high volume for my power clean, but at moderate intensity. the reason:
1. save time by not doing huge volume for each workout(I do other excercises, too.)
2. my recovery from the squat position is my weakness so building leg strength before I start the strength phase of my Oly-lifts may help me, right?

essentially, I'm giving each workout a separate period and they're 90 deg out of phase with each other. yeah, like sines and cosines if you're a geek :smile:
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Old 04-15-2004, 07:07 AM   #2
Kevin Roddy
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CB -

Personally, I'm not as big on periodization as I am on programs like Crossfit or stuff by Pavel. Since you asked about periodization, however, I'll try to answer your question:

I suppose it would be interesting to follow different periodization schedules for different exercises, but I personally think that's too complex. I don't see any reason why it wouldn't work, though - however, I could be wrong.
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Old 04-15-2004, 07:55 AM   #3
Brian Hand
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Crossbones, I'm not sure this is the best way to apply periodization. First off that classic phasing is a little dated, and it is mainly geared toward sports conditioning. The ways that volume and intensity are manipulated are much different than for olympic lifting.

Even if you want to work that way, though, your 90 degrees out of phase approach has a flaw. Classic periodization is supposed to work not just on specific exercises but on total training volume and intensity. To apply your mathematical model, sketch f(x) = sin(x) + cos(x). You're flattening out the curve, and the whole point is the ups and downs.
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Old 04-15-2004, 08:47 AM   #4
Dan John
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Crossbones, periodization has been replaced...in about 1972...with a concept called "block training." There is nothing wrong with your model of hypertrophy, strength, power, transition/recovery...but it is NOT what people are doing in the O lifts and the O sports. For an introduction, I made a short Powerpoint

http://danjohn.org/tim_files/frame.html

Modern training is a block of training that builds on the previous blocks. Throwers now throw all year, O lift all year, hypertrophy all year, sprint all year, but the internal training is waved. So, you might start the year with High Hang Snatches, the next block would be Hang Snatches and the next full snatches. That might take nine weeks to move through these three lifts. In sprinting, you might start with three weeks of steep uphill sprints, three weeks of "bleachers," then a few weeks of track work...200's maybe...then flow through some other stuff.

Modern periodization is based on a few words from the old Eastern Bloc...my favorite is "General Manysidedness" which doesn't translate well, but may be translated (honestly...not getting a nickel for this) into "Crossfit." They also used the word "accumulation." So, as you accumulate training "perks" through the year...lifts up, bodyfat done, tech better, more tactical work, more competitions, better health...you should improve. Then, they "transformed" into the final comp phase where you simply strive to compete at your highest level for that year.

Really, the best place to see this in the javelin throw...Jeff Gorski has some pics and articles at
http://www.intrex.net/klubkeihas/index.htm
worth looking at.

On leg strength issues, if you go into my site:
http://danjohn.org/coach you may or may not find this article:
http://danjohn.org/deadstop.html

It might help.
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Old 04-17-2004, 06:34 AM   #5
Barry Cooper
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Check out the article "Chasing your tail" from Louie Simmons at www.westside-barbell.com . Go to articles, and it's in the newer articles batch. It's about half way through. He discusses the concept of periodization well, IMHO. Most of my pullup ideas--whatever their worth, which remains to be seen--come from that article.
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