CrossFit Discussion Board  

Go Back   CrossFit Discussion Board > CrossFit Forum > Equipment
CrossFit Home Forum Site Rules CrossFit FAQ Search Today's Posts Mark Forums Read

Equipment Outfitting a serious gym. Vendors & suppliers. Devices & equipment

Reply
 
Thread Tools
Old 11-25-2005, 06:58 PM   #1
Wayne Lowry
Member Wayne Lowry is offline
 
Profile:
Join Date: Sep 2005
Location: seneca  mo
Posts: 17
I know this is going to sound like a stupid question, but ill ask anyway. why are olympic style bars used to crossfit? wont any barbell set work? thanks, i am sure it will be a no brainer after i here the reasoning, wayne.
  Reply With Quote
Old 11-25-2005, 09:34 PM   #2
Josh Brehm
Member Josh Brehm is offline
 
Josh Brehm's Avatar
 
Profile:
Join Date: Mar 2005
Location: Dallas  Oregon
Posts: 560
I'm still a newbie, but I'll try answering anyway. Olympic sets are much stronger and can hold much more weight, also you can load bumper plates on an olympic bar to make training the OLY lifts safer. It's "better" to use an olympic set, but if all you have is a regular standard barbell set, that'll work too, just can't go as far with it, or use it as safely.
  Reply With Quote
Old 11-25-2005, 10:38 PM   #3
Lisa Sorbo
Member Lisa Sorbo is offline
 
Profile:
Join Date: Oct 2005
Location: Corona Del Mar  CA
Posts: 118
I thought the primary purpose behind using Olympic bars was for the O-lifts - the spinning part.
  Reply With Quote
Old 11-26-2005, 08:40 AM   #4
Lincoln Brigham
Member Lincoln Brigham is offline
 
Lincoln Brigham's Avatar
 
Profile:
Join Date: May 2003
Location: Kirkland  WA
Posts: 3,987
Standard bars: There is no "standard" for the dimensions of the bar or the plates. The grip AND the sleeves are one piece, usually 1" and often a hair more. Plates that may fit on one standard bar quite possibly won't fit on another brand. Weight varies, usually anywhere from 7 to 15 lbs. Length varies from 5' to 7'. Steel used is inexpensive and is not suitable for heavy weights. The sleeves do not rotate, making them awkward to use with lifts like the snatch and the clean. Plates used on "standard" bars are always measured in pounds.

Certified Olympic bars: Currently there are only 3 or 4 manufacturers who make true Olympic bars, approved for use at the Olympics by the I.W.F.: Uesaka, Eleiko, Werk San, and York. (York may be getting out of the certified Olympic bar business, however.) For the 2008 there will be a Chinese brand - Beijing Crown - that is I.W.F. certified. Sleeves are 50mm diameter and use needle bearings. Grip is 28mm for men, 25mm for women. Weight is 20 kilos for men, 15 kilos for women. Cost starts at around $700.

Powerlifting bars: Usually the same approximate dimensions as I.W.F. Olympic bars. Certified for competition use by one or more of the powerlifting federations. Sometimes they use a thicker 30mm grip. Weight goes from 20 kilos, sometimes more. Most international powerlifting events and many U.S. powerlifting meets use equipment measured in kilos, but some U.S. powerlifting meets use pounds. Most results for U.S. powerlifting meets are reported in pounds even when metric equipment is used. (Like putting grams of sugar in gallons of coffee.) Sometimes specialty bars are used for the deadlift. Usually a little cheaper than I.W.F. bars, often using less expensive bushings instead of bearings. Steel is used is often comparable in strength to I.W.F. bars, but is often a tad stiffer and has less whip.

"Olympic" bars: not necessarily suitable for the Olympics, but they have the same rough dimensions as I.W.F. bars. These bars might emulate either powerlifting or certified Olympic bars. Roughly 7' long and have a 28-30mm grip. The sleeves diameter varies from 50mm (1.9685") to 2" sleeves, which means that most "Olympic" plates will fit on most bars. (Plates with 50mm holes meant for the international market might not fit on bars with 2" sleeves meant for the U.S market, however.) Weight is almost always about 20 kilos (44.1 pounds) give or take a half kilo depending on manufacturer. Often referred to as 45 lb. bars. There are a few brands available in the U.S. in 15 lb. and 30 lb. weights. Cost varies from $65 to $600, quality and suitability for use varies accordingly. They may use bushing or they might use needle bearing sleeves. Steel may range from 65,000 P.S.I. rating to over 200,000 P.S.I. Quality may be comparable to certifed bars or it may be comparable to cheap "standard" bars. Plates used with these bars may be measured in either kilos or pounds, but both measuring systems share the same 20 kilo, 450mm diameter plate with a 50mm hole (known as the 45 lb. plate in the U.S.)

Why the USOC does not sue for use of the trademarked name "Olympic" with non-certified equipment baffles me, as it obviously causes confusion and lessens the value of the name.

(Message edited by lincoln on November 26, 2005)
  Reply With Quote
Old 11-26-2005, 10:47 AM   #5
Josh Brehm
Member Josh Brehm is offline
 
Josh Brehm's Avatar
 
Profile:
Join Date: Mar 2005
Location: Dallas  Oregon
Posts: 560
I'm definitely saving that for the next time someone asks me why use olympic bars, thanks lincoln.
  Reply With Quote
Reply


Thread Tools

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

vB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is Off
HTML code is Off
Forum Jump

Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
What is "Hopper-Style WOD"? Nick Cruz Workout of the Day 2 04-04-2007 01:11 PM
Choosing a style Mark Sampson CrossPit 2 08-19-2006 05:56 AM
Lady olympic lifters at the olympic training center Mike Burgener Community 0 08-03-2006 07:39 AM
Olympic-ish style lifting for reps. Jibreel Freeland Exercises 7 06-19-2006 10:53 AM
Growing up - Crossfit style Ryan Atkins Testimonials 0 04-27-2003 09:09 AM


All times are GMT -7. The time now is 02:04 PM.


Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.6.8
Copyright ©2000 - 2017, Jelsoft Enterprises Ltd.
CrossFit is a registered trademark of CrossFit Inc.