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Old 09-15-2006, 07:01 AM   #1
Jon Gilson
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I've developed a portable pull-up bar that has served Again Faster, Crossfit Boston, and Crossfit Topsfield very well, and I'm offering it to the Crossfit Community at large!

It's much more durable than any door-mounted bar I've used, and it can be hung virtually anywhere there is a horizontal span--trees, rafters, the porch, the basement...

The setup is rated to 400+ pounds, and can be leveled off any span, horizontal or not, using the included lashing straps.

The AF Bar is available for only $60.00. I ship via FedEx Home Delivery for a flat fee of $15.00. If you'd like to pick the Bar up in Boston, there is no shipping charge.

Visit http://www.againfasterequipment.blogspot.com for more details and to order!

Check it out!

If you have any questions about the rig, feel free to shoot me an email: jon@againfaster.com.

Go faster!

Best,

Jon


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Old 09-18-2006, 07:52 PM   #2
Jason Scully
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Jon,

Your pull-up bar looks pretty cool.

Also I checked out your pictures and I saw that you made pull-up bars out of pipe for your gym. I was wondering what it is you used.

Did you use steel plumbing pipe?
What thickness did you use?
How did you go about mounting them?

I would really appreciate your help. I'm looking to put something like that up in my gym. I assume it's pretty sturdy.

Thanks
Jason
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Old 09-18-2006, 08:40 PM   #3
Josh Brehm
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Jon, I don't mean at all to be rude, but $60 seems to be quite expensive for what appears to be galvanized pipe and long tie downs, is there something more to it?
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Old 09-19-2006, 07:53 AM   #4
Jon Gilson
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Jason,

You're looking at the pullup bar at Crossfit Boston, Neal Thompson's gym. The bar is 1.5" steel, mounted to the wall and floor using flanges, and put together using a pipe wrench and a whole lot of struggling. If you choose to build your own, get lots of loc-tite and a crew together. Remember to measure twice...

Josh,

I appreciate the skepticism, but it's unwarranted. The bar is made using ordinary pipe, as well as a unique hang-all and carabiner combination that allows it to be used for multiple purposes. In addition to the pullup bar, it can be used to attach chains to train the olympic lifts as well as acceleration out of the hole on squats. The lashing straps are your garden variety tie-downs, very similar to those on Crossfit-issue Power Rings.

You can see the bar in more detail at http://www.againfasterequipment.blogspot.com

If you price out the components and the build time, I believe you'll find the price to be quite reasonable.

Best,

Jon
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Old 09-19-2006, 04:07 PM   #5
Jerry Hill
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Jon,
You have mail and payment...exactly what I have been looking for.

Hey, by the way absolutely enjoyed your dialogue from the blog regarding; "For love of the Game."

I pulled this quote from it:
"When you’re in a room full of people giving their best, you draw from their strength, and they from yours. It looks like a competition on the outside, but in reality, we are all in it together. We share every agonizing moment, and we come out the other side better for the experience."
- Jonathan Gilson, Again Faster


Great piece of writing brother...

-jh
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Old 09-20-2006, 05:50 AM   #6
Jon Gilson
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Thanks, Jerry. That story is very close to my heart. I find that the best ones always are...

Best,

Jon

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Old 09-20-2006, 10:06 AM   #7
Martin Schap
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Not to be devil's advocate, but what benefit does this provide that I don't get from my rings and my fixed pull-up bar? I've often thought that building something like this would be cool, but was stopped by lack of expertise and the thought that my current equipment already provides both the effect of instability and the benefits of doing pull-ups on a bar.
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Old 09-20-2006, 12:36 PM   #8
Jon Gilson
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Martin,

Thanks for the question! I'm sure you're not the first person to look at this with a skeptical eye.

First and foremost, the bar provides portability! You can take it just about anywhere, and hang it off of anything that is even remotely horizontal. Rafters, trees, and street signs come to mind. It's a very useful tool for those who run outdoor workouts where a fixed bar might not be available, and rings are not the desired solution.

Also, many leases will not let the tenant make permanent modifications to their residence, eliminating the possibility of a decent fixed bar.

The AF bar can be mounted using existing exposed beams or by placing eye-hooks in ceiling studs. You can set it up properly in about 10 minutes. Damage is non-existent or minimal, and you don't have to worry about installing the bar at the proper width, as is the case with rings (50 cm).

Four feet of bar gives all sorts of margin for mounting on 18" studs as well as in buildings utilizing older construction styles, and the dynamic nature of the straps greatly reduces the stress placed on the structure as compared to a fixed bar.

As you know, the feeling while working on a bar is very different from that of rings. While it is possible to rotate rings to achieve greater leverage in mid-kip, this isn't possible with the AF Bar, making the movement harder, and ultimately, more beneficial.

As you mentioned, instability adds another dimension to pullups that a fixed bar doesn't provide. Using the AF Bar requires the athlete to stabilize the bar in space during the kip. Although I have absolutely no evidence here, I'm sure this results in greater activation of the shoulder stabilizers than a fixed bar.

The AF Bar also serves as a trainer for Olympic lifts, were you inclined to purchase chains. The Bar is removed from the lashing straps and attached to the chains using the included carabiners.

Quite simply, when you perform a C&J or a Snatch with chains attached, you get immediate force-feedback as to the quality of the lift. Because the desired bar path on these lifts is nearly vertical, the degree to which the chains sway indicates the degree of deviation from the desired path.

More swaying equals a poor lift.

The Bar (w/chains) can also be used to train the core, doing one- and two-armed waiters' walks. The instability of chain significantly increases the difficulty of these exercises. We've had a ton of fun taking the Bar for walks here in Boston.

Ultimately, this bar provides a very specific solution with a whole bunch of added bonuses. If you need one, you'll know it!

Best,

Jon





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Old 09-22-2006, 03:44 AM   #9
Dave Picardy
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Great descriptions Jon. We had Jon make us an AF bar after one of his workouts in the park. I always enjoy new toys. I have not used it yet as a portable pullup bar and that is what it was intended for. I use it more for some olympic lifting techniques, and waiters walks. For the money it definately has many uses. That is why I bought it.http://www.crossfit.com/discus/messages/26/30429.jpg

Dave Picardy
CrossFit Topsfield
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Old 09-22-2006, 07:42 AM   #10
Martin Schap
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Thanks Jon
You answered my question. At the moment I'm in the market for a kettlebell or two, but your bar has definitely been added to my gear wish list. Just sitting here I can think of dozens of places and situations where I've wished for something exactly like what you describe. Doing pull-ups off a hotel fire escape comes to mind...
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