CrossFit Discussion Board  

Go Back   CrossFit Discussion Board > In Sickness and In Health > Health and Medical Issues
CrossFit Home Forum Site Rules CrossFit FAQ Search Today's Posts Mark Forums Read

Health and Medical Issues For other than injuries

Reply
 
Thread Tools
Old 03-10-2012, 01:28 PM   #11
Michael Ko
Member Michael Ko is offline
 
Profile:
Join Date: Nov 2011
Location: Manhattan  Kansas
Posts: 34
Re: PT school?

Quote:
Originally Posted by James Chambers View Post
1) What are the major differences between what one can and can't do with an MPT/MS vs. a DPT?
2) How does one find and identify a good PT program, that is, if one is committed towards a more progressive, hands-on approach?
3) Anyone know of decent programs around either ATL, GA, or the Hudson Valley, NY?
4) Assuming one hasn't taken a number of the pre-req courses, like me, as I was a Russian Studies major undergrad, do you just take those in a non-official capacity anywhere anytime?
5) Are there tracks of grad study for PT that don't require full-time study, ie, could I find a program that would also allow me to keep running a gym, have 3 kids, and occasionally breathe?

Thanks for any thoughts!
Jim
I've answered a few posts on this board regarding injuries because I'm a PT. Here are some things you should know regarding your questions.
1.Practically all PT programs in the US are DPT programs (3 years). There is no difference between MPT or DPT in terms of what they can do because all PT's are licensed by the state as a registered PT. The APTA has instituted Vision 2020, which includes for all PT's to have DPT. This is just a thing they are doing to try and build autonomy within the field.

2. All PT schools are trying to teach all the basics of evaluation, treatment, differential diagnosis, research. When graduating from PT school, you really don't know that much because you lack so much experience with doing manual therapy on patients. You get good because of time and further instruction after school (continuing education or residency). You can argue that one school might be better than another but I think good PT's are developed by the individual, not produced by the school.

4. All PT schools require human anatomy/physiology, 1 year of chemistry/physics/biology all with a lab, stats or calculus, some psych/sociology, and some require speech.

5. As mentioned before, PT school is usually 3 years. I really don't know if there is a part-time option.

Here's another thing to think about. Most states require that a patient needs to have a prescription from a physician to get physical therapy. Some states have direct access where a patient can go see a PT without seeing a MD first. So even though you have all this education, you might be bound by certain rules and regulations that might make it difficult for people to see you. Then you need to think about the insurance side or payment from the patient.

On the flip side, athletic trainers and massage therapists have direct access. Education is not as extensive and might work with your current situation a little better. Things to think about.
  Reply With Quote
Old 03-10-2012, 02:07 PM   #12
Brian Strump
Affiliate Brian Strump is offline
 
Brian Strump's Avatar
 
Profile:
Join Date: Sep 2009
Location: Charlotte  NC
Posts: 2,565
Re: PT school?

I agree, which is why I brought up the AT. Chiro is also a long, and expensive route, however you do not need a referral to see one.

Personally, I love getting a massage, however, for a long term goal, I think what would benefit you most would be the AT over the MT. The work span of a massage therapist is pretty short given the toll it takes on a body; and I think the education you'd get from an AT program will be head and shoulders over what you'll get from a MT, in how it pertains to what I suppose you want to do with it.

Quote:
Originally Posted by Michael Ko View Post
I've answered a few posts on this board regarding injuries because I'm a PT. Here are some things you should know regarding your questions.
1.Practically all PT programs in the US are DPT programs (3 years). There is no difference between MPT or DPT in terms of what they can do because all PT's are licensed by the state as a registered PT. The APTA has instituted Vision 2020, which includes for all PT's to have DPT. This is just a thing they are doing to try and build autonomy within the field.

2. All PT schools are trying to teach all the basics of evaluation, treatment, differential diagnosis, research. When graduating from PT school, you really don't know that much because you lack so much experience with doing manual therapy on patients. You get good because of time and further instruction after school (continuing education or residency). You can argue that one school might be better than another but I think good PT's are developed by the individual, not produced by the school.

4. All PT schools require human anatomy/physiology, 1 year of chemistry/physics/biology all with a lab, stats or calculus, some psych/sociology, and some require speech.

5. As mentioned before, PT school is usually 3 years. I really don't know if there is a part-time option.

Here's another thing to think about. Most states require that a patient needs to have a prescription from a physician to get physical therapy. Some states have direct access where a patient can go see a PT without seeing a MD first. So even though you have all this education, you might be bound by certain rules and regulations that might make it difficult for people to see you. Then you need to think about the insurance side or payment from the patient.

On the flip side, athletic trainers and massage therapists have direct access. Education is not as extensive and might work with your current situation a little better. Things to think about.
__________________
Brian Strump, D.C., FMS, NKT
www.crossfitsteelecreek.com/
  Reply With Quote
Old 03-10-2012, 04:30 PM   #13
Mike Hopper
Member Mike Hopper is offline
 
Profile:
Join Date: Jun 2010
Location: Waterloo  IL
Posts: 157
Re: PT school?

The biggest issue with athletic training (I am one) is the revenue aspect of it. Yes, there is some third-party billing going on in athletic training, but it's very hit or miss still. Biggest thing is the Medicare aspect of it which will be hard to change...

That said, I love my profession and I really think athletic trainers can do a lot of good for society as a whole but especially those who are trying to continue to be athletes such as CrossFit individuals.

I am trained in Graston Technique and utilize it a lot. And I'm trying to learn the Functional Movement stuff but can't afford the course at this time...
  Reply With Quote
Old 03-10-2012, 06:55 PM   #14
James Chambers
Affiliate James Chambers is offline
 
Profile:
Join Date: Feb 2011
Location: Hudson  NY
Posts: 76
Re: PT school?

I'm really intrigued by this AT idea; it seems like it may be more in step with my goals; I guess because I grew up as an athlete, I had just assumed that an AT was just a dude that hung out in HS and College Gyms, I guess I'd never heard of an AT in private practice. So an AT can just do that?

What would the name of the exact program of study I'd be looking into be? Athletic Training?


Also, do ATs ever get extra certs in things like MAT, ART, Rolfing, FST, MT, etc?

Sorry for what sound like dumb questions, I really am a novice in the specifics of the professions/schooling, I just like the science/theory of it, know the body well, and have had good PT/Chiro/MTs save my life from a lot of crappiness, and I'm fascinated by it and want to find a way to go in that direction!

Thanks for all the input.

Last edited by James Chambers : 03-10-2012 at 07:00 PM.
  Reply With Quote
Old 03-10-2012, 07:15 PM   #15
Michael Ko
Member Michael Ko is offline
 
Profile:
Join Date: Nov 2011
Location: Manhattan  Kansas
Posts: 34
Re: PT school?

ATC (certified athletic trainer) is a bachelor's degree. you should be able to do a part-time education program. the only thing that will be difficult is ATC programs usually use students to work for the sports teams. that will include traveling with the team and being around for 2 a days.

some of the things you listed require a master degree or above, some do not. you should be able to do graston, rolf, functional movement with a bachelor's degree. maitland, mckenzie, institute of physical art are PT specific and only issue them if you have a MPT/DPT. you can look into ASTYM because they instruct ATC in that system.
  Reply With Quote
Old 03-10-2012, 07:31 PM   #16
Mike Hopper
Member Mike Hopper is offline
 
Profile:
Join Date: Jun 2010
Location: Waterloo  IL
Posts: 157
Re: PT school?

Quote:
Originally Posted by Michael Ko View Post
ATC (certified athletic trainer) is a bachelor's degree. you should be able to do a part-time education program. the only thing that will be difficult is ATC programs usually use students to work for the sports teams. that will include traveling with the team and being around for 2 a days.

some of the things you listed require a master degree or above, some do not. you should be able to do graston, rolf, functional movement with a bachelor's degree. maitland, mckenzie, institute of physical art are PT specific and only issue them if you have a MPT/DPT. you can look into ASTYM because they instruct ATC in that system.
Sorry Michael, I'm going to be difficult...


A) "ATC" is a credential and is not a noun. The National Athletic Trainers' Association and the Board of Certification for Athletic Trainers is very specific to make that known.

B) There are no part-time athletic training education programs because it is pretty intensive. I think people would struggle to do a program part time. Not only the class schedule, but then you add in the required clinical experiences (~20 hours a week).

--------
James, you would want to get a bachelor's degree in athletic training. There are some programs that are an entry-level Masters Degree which is not a terrible alternative if you already have a bachelors, but I have a co-worker who went that route who has told me that it is definitely different than somebody going and getting a masters after certification..

I have Graston Technique training which is a form of instrument-assisted soft tissue massage and I really love it. GT utilizes stainless steel instruments to break up adhesions when combined with exercise and stretching. Active Release Technique interests me as well, but it is super-expensive and way outside of my budget currently.

James, feel free to continue asking questions. I'll answer as best as I can and I'm sure you'll have related professions chiming in as well..
  Reply With Quote
Reply


Thread Tools

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

vB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is Off
HTML code is Off
Forum Jump

Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
Deadlift form old school, new school right or wrong Jimmy Nelson Exercises 9 12-06-2011 10:49 PM
Road Work - Old School meets New School Dave Lemanczyk Exercises 4 04-10-2009 11:25 AM
Went Old School George Mounce Community 0 09-24-2007 01:46 PM
Going old school Mark Garcia Fitness 8 08-26-2006 03:17 AM
Old School! Jason Simpkins Exercises 4 05-20-2005 02:24 PM


All times are GMT -7. The time now is 10:06 PM.


Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.6.8
Copyright ©2000 - 2014, Jelsoft Enterprises Ltd.
CrossFit is a registered trademark of CrossFit Inc.