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Old 03-20-2014, 05:35 AM   #21
Snir Golan
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Re: Crossfit vs. Regular Weight Training

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Originally Posted by Miles Roberts View Post
I'm 32 and have been doing CF for 6 months. Honestly, as I look back on my life, if I could change anything, it would be to start CF as early as possible. I see it as a (not kidding) lifelong thing. If I could have started it sooner, I'd be that much better for it.

Hope that answers your question, OP.

Also, for what its worth, CF includes a lot of weight lifting.
exactly how i feel. i am 35 years old and if i could go back and start CF when i was 21, i would be very happy. I used to do the Globo gym thing, did some P90X and a few other things but nothing really got me as excited about being healthy as CF does.
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Old 03-26-2014, 12:36 PM   #22
Jose Soriano
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Re: Crossfit vs. Regular Weight Training

Crossfit is not different from "regular weight training" (I'll touch on that in a second). Crossfit is crosstraining that incorporates "regular weight training" in a format with one particular goal - increased "fitness."

Regular weight training - what is this? In my experience this falls into several categories.
- the DVD approach: this is the tae-bos through P90xs out there that incorporate up to about 15lbs, maybe kettlebells included. Some will use weights, but it's not really a main factor.
- the gymrat approach: this is the folks who have been lifting weights (not "weight lifting") since they were x age, and spend 2-4 hours a day in the gym hanging out doing random stuff.
- the "weight lifting" approach: the people who go to the gym with a schedule, a diet, a notebook, and a set pattern of exercises and weight increments projecting the next 6 months to a year.
- the bodybuilding approach: this is the same as above, but with a much more specific goal to their training.
- the athletic approach: similar to bodybuilding, but with a focus on particular performance, be they runners trying to get faster, are the football player trying to get stronger.
- the newb sheep approach: the people who go to the gym to lift weights to get stronger, but don't really know what they're doing so just do curls and bench press, but don't really understand reps and sets or progression.

Every approach has it's goal, pros and cons. Some are psychological, some are social, some are physical, but it doesn't matter as long as you figure out what you want, why you're doing something, and whether it furthers your goal.

Some people are process oriented, where success or failure are secondary to following every step accurately and appropriately (like research scientists), while others are goal oriented, and are more interested in results than obstructive procedure (like inventors).

Crossfit is a mix of all of the above, with some method to the madness. It's a strong introduction to the many things that a gym has to offer aside from being lost, and most importantly, crossfit is a coaching methodology for the masses that helps them make sense out of fitness. It's a gateway that opens the door to a new world with an excellent map and guidebook, that can be helpful for both absolute beginners and decade long experts, because there's always something new to learn.

Just as every approach has flaws, so does Crossfit. The one I've found is that it spreads itself too thin, and this is in part due to the amount of people. Everyone is different, which is the magic of crossfit in the beginning - scaling works for everybody regardless of their goals or knowledge. As the athlete gains knowledge and further defines their goals, however, crossfit shotgun approach does not meet the surgical needs required. It CAN, but usually doesn't because it needs to tailor to the other 300 people who just walked in the door for the first time, and give them their fair shot.

The main problem with aaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaall of this, regardless of what "this" is, be it opinions on bodybuilding, endurance training, WODs, low carb diets, and running shoes, is that everyone is different, everyone has prejudices for and against, everyone has different goals, everyone's body has different needs and reactions, and science is still struggling to understand the human body in general, and hasn't even looked at your specifically. Everything works better than everything else, and nothing works as advertised because whatever.

So, what is "Fitness?" Nobody knows, see above. But crossfit will get you ready for the crossfit games, so check those out. If you see something and think "I wanna do that," Crossfit will at least introduce you to it.

So, short version:

There is no short version, go move something heavy.
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Old 03-26-2014, 12:51 PM   #23
Luke Sirakos
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Re: Crossfit vs. Regular Weight Training

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Hi, I am looking into both Crossfit and normal weight training. I was just wondering what distinguishes the two. As in, what kind of people do Crossfit as opposed to regular weights? I'm only 18 and sort of getting a feel for both of them. Thanks for your help and time!
In my opinion Crossfit is great for getting in shape but if your goals are aesthetics or powerlifting oriented you are better served following a program that specializes in those things. Also, there is no reason as to why you can't follow a bodybuilding or powerlifting routine and be in great shape as well, in fact I was in the best shape of my life when I was doing a powerlifting style routine with minimal cardio.

If you want to pack on muscle you want to follow a routine that promotes hypertrophy, if you want to lift lots of weight you want to follow a powerlifting routine. Can you increase muscle mass and strength numbers in Crossfit? Yep, sure can but it is far from the most efficient way of going about those things.

Instead, if your goal is to get in shape and adding muscle mass or increasing your strength numbers are nice by products then Crossfit could be a great fit for you. The competition/community aspect can be great as well since for some people that is what they need to be more disciplined about working out.

Personally, if I was 18 all over again, knowing what I know now, I would follow a powerlifting routine with bodybuilding/hypertrophy inducing auxiliary work while eating everything I could find to build a really solid base of strength and size.
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Old 03-27-2014, 09:21 AM   #24
Pedro Farah
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Re: Crossfit vs. Regular Weight Training

I wonder, wouldn't a strength bias crossfit program, comprised of low rep high vol powerlifts and olys, be just as efficient in gaining strength and mass? Could it even be more efficient?
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Old 03-27-2014, 09:25 AM   #25
Luke Sirakos
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Re: Crossfit vs. Regular Weight Training

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I wonder, wouldn't a strength bias crossfit program, comprised of low rep high vol powerlifts and olys, be just as efficient in gaining strength and mass? Could it even be more efficient?
No, it won't be as efficient as a powerlifting routine, it will be more efficient in strength building than a bunch of metcons though. Neither will be as efficient for building mass as a routine that focuses on hypertrophy with an appropriate diet that accompanies it.
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Old 03-27-2014, 10:39 AM   #26
David Finney
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Re: Crossfit vs. Regular Weight Training

The OP never stated his goals, so there's no way to recommend a program. Besides, how can you define either? What is 'regular weight training'? Well, that could be 1,000,000 different things.

What is Crossfit? Crossfit is a brand, not a type of workout. The OP needs to dive deeper and ask himself what his goals are. Does he want to be stronger, faster, bigger, smaller, etc? Does he want to run fast, jump high, or hit hard? There are benefits to every workout program out there, but you have to know the end goal to choose the correct one.
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Old 03-27-2014, 12:35 PM   #27
Derek McLaughlin
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Re: Crossfit vs. Regular Weight Training

A lot of good dialogue here. Like pretty much everyone has said, it depends on your goals.

I used to be an athlete, after sports I followed a typical "gym-rat" type of program, just focusing on lifting, hitting all the different body parts, but I realized that I wasn't able to do a lot of things I enjoyed doing. I switched to crossfit-style programming, because I want to play rec sports, ski, wakeboard, do triathlons, look better, and (maybe most of all), when the time comes to have kids, be able to play with them all day and not have to sit around and watch.

It's all about what YOU want.
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Old 03-27-2014, 08:54 PM   #28
Alex Thomas
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Re: Crossfit vs. Regular Weight Training

Okay, I'm going to jump in here and ask a slightly off topic question but it was briefly touched on in previous posts... I've also asked this question before but I'm always interested in different opinions...

I'm primarily interested in aesthetics but I genuinely enjoy crossfit. I want a lean & "cut" body... I know women can't get "bulky" unless they try to do so, but I don't want a super muscular, thick body. Can I have my cake and eat it, too regarding crossfit? Or am I going to sacrifice some of my aesthetic goals to do something I really like (Crossfit)?
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Old 03-27-2014, 09:00 PM   #29
Mark E. Wallace
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Re: Crossfit vs. Regular Weight Training

wfs https://www.google.com/search?q=cami...w=1440&bih=740

- Mark
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Old 03-27-2014, 09:19 PM   #30
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Re: Crossfit vs. Regular Weight Training

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Touche, Camille and her body do take the cake.
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